The Study of Knowledge and Behaviour on Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Consumption in University Students

Authors

  • Jutawan Nuanchankong Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Valaya Alongkorn Rajabhat University under the Royal Patronage
  • Pattamaporn Jaroennon Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Valaya Alongkorn Rajabhat University under the Royal Patronage
  • Sakunta Manakla Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Valaya Alongkorn Rajabhat University under the Royal Patronage
  • Sujarinee Sangwanna Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Valaya Alongkorn Rajabhat University under the Royal Patronage
  • Taweeporn Phansawat Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Valaya Alongkorn Rajabhat University under the Royal Patronage

Keywords:

knowledge; behaviour; sugar sweetened beverage consumption

Abstract

This research of cross-sectional study aimed to evaluate the knowledge and behavior on sugar-sweetened beverage consumption in students of Valaya Alongkorn Rajabhat University under the royal patronage, Pathumthani province, Thailand. A set of 50 questionnaires consisting of personal information, knowledge and behavior of sugar-sweetened beverage consumption were distributed. The participants were 35 male (70%) and 15 females (30%). The majority of the participant age ranged from 17-20 years (54%) and were within the normal weight range (60%). The results showed that most participants knew good to an excellent level. The frequency of sugar-sweetened beverage intake was 1-2 times per week, and the preferred beverages were yoghurt drink 28 people (56%), bubble milk tea or tea 22 people (44%) and carbonated beverage 21 people (42%). Many subjects consumed fruits and vegetable juice 20 people and flavored milk 22 people at the frequency of 3-4 times a week (40% and 44% respectively). However, most university students did not drink coffee and energy drinks. The results indicated that most of the students had an excellent level of knowledge yet still consumed high sugar drinks. Therefore, students' awareness should be raised to achieve sustainable behavior.

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References

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Published

2021-12-23

How to Cite

Nuanchankong, J. ., Jaroennon, P. ., Manakla, S., Sangwanna, S. ., & Phansawat, T. . (2021). The Study of Knowledge and Behaviour on Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Consumption in University Students . EAU Heritage Journal Science and Technology, 15(3), 139–148. Retrieved from https://he01.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/EAUHJSci/article/view/249100

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Research Articles