Effects of Behavioral Modification Program on High-Iodine Food Consumption among Patients with Graves’ Disease in Iodine-Sufficient Area

Authors

  • Juthathip Posuwan Faculty of Public Health, Burapha University
  • Yuvadee Rodjarkpai Faculty of Public Health, Burapha University
  • Pajaree Abdullakasim Faculty of Public Health, Burapha University
  • Alisara Wongsuttilert Faculty of Public Health, Burapha University

Keywords:

high-iodine foods, Graves’ disease, iodine-sufficient areas

Abstract

Introduction: The incidence of Graves’ disease in iodine-sufficient areas is an escalating trend.  It is essential, therefore, to educate and advise patients with Graves’ disease about consumption of high-iodine foods.

Research objectives:  To examine the effects of a behavioral modification program on high-iodine food consumption based on a self-efficacy theory among patients with Graves’ disease in iodine-sufficient areas.

Research methodology: This quasi-experimental study with a pre- and post-test design, was conducted in 30 patients with Graves’ disease.  The participants were purposively recruited from the Thyroid Clinic at Burapha Hospital from March to April 2021 and had high frequency of high-iodine food consumption (≥3 times per week). These patients were provided with online learning media for 4 weeks. Data were collected using a questionnaire and a frequency assessment of iodine-rich food consumption, with a reliability of Cronbach’s alpha coefficient of .81. Data were analyzed using paired t-test. 

Results: Results showed that at follow-up, patients with Graves’ disease had significantly higher knowledge about Graves’ disease and high-iodine foods, greater self-efficacy, and higher self-expectations than at baseline (p<.05). Moreover, the mean consumption frequency of high-iodine food items among participants was significantly decreased at follow-up (p<.001).             

Conclusion: These findings suggest that the behavioral modification program on    high-iodine food consumption based on self-efficacy theory in this study can improve knowledge and reduce high-iodine food consumption among patients with Graves’ disease.

Implications for practice: This program should be applied to patients with Graves’ disease, particularly those in iodine-sufficient areas, to improve high-iodine food consumption behavior and health promotion.

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Published

2022-08-01

How to Cite

1.
Posuwan J, Rodjarkpai Y, Abdullakasim P, Wongsuttilert A. Effects of Behavioral Modification Program on High-Iodine Food Consumption among Patients with Graves’ Disease in Iodine-Sufficient Area. JHNR [Internet]. 2022 Aug. 1 [cited 2023 Jan. 31];38(2):73-8. Available from: https://he01.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/bcnbangkok/article/view/250350

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Section

Research articles