Optimal Number of Nuad Thai (Thai Massage) Sessions for Patients with Shoulder Pain

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rapeepol runparb
Panu Khuwuthyakorn
Phumin Chalacheewa
Kanchana Hattasin
Sudathip Kidmhai
Phanupong Phutrakool
Duangkaew Panyaphu
Thanat Nakaphan
Wandee Yanpaisan
Monthaka Teerachaisakul
Krit Pongpirul

Abstract

Shoulder pain is a common symptom in everyday life. In Thai traditional medicine, shoulder pain could be alleviated by Thai traditional massage. However, there was no conclusion on which numbers of massage session were optimal. This observational study aimed to identify optimal numbers of Thai traditional massage session for patients with shoulder pain. Participants were 30 patients with shoulder pain who had history taking, physical examination, Pressure Pain Threshold (PPT) measurement at tender pain, and shoulder pain assessment using Numeric Rating Scale (NRS). The participants had 9-step Thai traditional massage and were measured for PPT and NRS after massage and then had appointed for another massage session until NRS was 0-1 which numbers of total Thai traditional massage session were recorded. Descriptive statistic was used to describe data. There were 80% of participants whose shoulder pain were reduced to 0-1 after Thai traditional massage. The optimal number of Thai traditional massage session depended on shoulder pain level before treatment. The optimal numbers of Thai traditional massage session were 1.83±0.75 in patients with mild shoulder pain, 2.50±1.26 in patients with moderate shoulder pain, and 3.50±0.71 in patients with severe shoulder pain. In 80% successfully treated patients with shoulder pain, the optimal Thai traditional massage ranged from 2-4 sessions which depended on shoulder pain level before treatment.

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