Volume Calibration of “Tha-nan”and the effects in the efficacy of drugs preparation

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Witchayanee Panngam
Somchai Suriyakrai
Sakkrarn Sangkhamanon
Suppachai Tiyaworanant

Abstract

Tha-nan” in Thai traditional scriptures was different from “tha-nan luang”, the latter being a unit of volume equivalent to 1 liter. “Tha-nan luang” was used to measure out crude drugs for preparing medicines instead of traditional “tha-nan”, which might affect prepared drugs’ efficacy. The objective of this study was to calibrate the volume of traditional tha-nan and to evaluate the efficacy of wound-healing remedies prepared using calibrated tha-nan, compared with those prepared using tha-nan luang, in healing excision wounds on male Spraque-Dawley rats. The calibrated volume of “tha-nan” was calculated by multiplying the traditional “tha-nan” size number with 1.548, the converting factor, to obtain the volume in milliliters. The efficacy evaluation of the prepared wound-healing remedies showed that the oil remedies prepared with crude drugs measured out using the calibrated tha-nan (NR119/78cv) of 929 milliliters based on “tha-nan 600” and the balm remedy prepared with crude drugs measured out using the calibrated tha-nan (WP255/2cv) of 1,285 milliliters based on “tha-nan 830” were more efficacious than those prepared with crude drugs measured out using tha-nan luang.

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Author Biographies

Witchayanee Panngam, Master of Science Program in Thai Traditional Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002, Thailand. † Department of Clinical Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002, Thailand.

* Master of Science Program in Thai Traditional Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002, Thailand.

Department of Clinical Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002, Thailand.

Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002, Thailand

Department of Pharmacognosy and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002, Thailand.

Somchai Suriyakrai, * Master of Science Program in Thai Traditional Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002, Thailand

* Master of Science Program in Thai Traditional Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002, Thailand.

Department of Clinical Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002, Thailand.

Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002, Thailand

  • Department of Pharmacognosy and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002, Thailand.

Sakkrarn Sangkhamanon, * Master of Science Program in Thai Traditional Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002, Thailand

* Master of Science Program in Thai Traditional Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002, Thailand.

Department of Clinical Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002, Thailand.

Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002, Thailand

  • Department of Pharmacognosy and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002, Thailand.

Suppachai Tiyaworanant, * Master of Science Program in Thai Traditional Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002, Thailand

* Master of Science Program in Thai Traditional Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002, Thailand.

Department of Clinical Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002, Thailand.

Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002, Thailand

  • Department of Pharmacognosy and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002, Thailand.

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