Anatomical Locations in the Trunk Correlated with Basic Massage Lines and Signaling Points of Nuad Thai

Main Article Content

Narongsak Chantawang

Abstract

Court Type Thai Traditional Massage (CTTM) or Nuad Thai Raja Sum Nak is an effective treatment
for musculoskeletal disorders that are commonplace in Thai infirmaries and has specific major lines or points
for massage with deep compression and rhythmic gentle pressing. The aims of this study were to compare
surface landmarks and anatomical structures of the trunk in major basic massage lines (BLs), massage points
(MPs) and signaling point (SPs) between healthy volunteers and cadavers by percussion, auscultation,
bimanual palpation and dissection including measuring the applied pressure force by acupressure test in
healthy volunteers. In healthy volunteers, percussion or auscultation in lines and points of abdominal region
demonstrated a bowel sound, whereas for the back region a dull sound was demonstrated. Palpation indicated
there were muscles in both abdominal and back regions in all lines and points of CTTM. Dissection of
cadavers revealed the anatomical structures in the abdomen beneath major locations were mainly organs of
the gastrointestinal (GI) system with their associated small vessels and the large vessels. For the back area,
BLs and SPs are verified to be mostly muscular structures with their associated vessels and nerve branches.
The BLs of the shoulder correspond to the fleshy part of the upper trapezius muscle with related underlying
vessels and nerves. The averages of the commonly applied fingerûs pressure massage on abdominal, back and
shoulder areas were 5.32 ± 1.28 kg, 11.6 ± 1.45 kg and 8.5 ± 0.36 kg, respectively. The trunk MPs, BLs and
SPs used in CTTM are associated with or closely correlated to important anatomical structures, especially GI
tract organs, blood vessels, nerves and paravertebral muscles. The results of this study are important for
clinical practice and could lead to effective treatment with patient safety.

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.

Article Details

Section
Original Articles
Author Biography

Narongsak Chantawang, N/A

N/A

References

1. Suwannatrai U, editors. Thai therapeutic massage (Court type Thai traditional massage). 1 st ed. Bangkok:
Suphawanich publishing; 2003. 190 p. (in Thai)
2. Laohapand T, Jaturatamrong U, Jantabut C, Tonglue T, Kamkaew P, Punpeng P, et al. Thai traditional
medicine in the Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital. 1 st ed. Bangkok: Suphawanich publishing; 2009. 115 p. (in Thai)
3. Dictionary of Medical and Pharmaceutical science, Royal Institute of Thailand. 2nd ed. Bangkok: The War
Veterans Organization of Thailand Publishing; 2010. Massage, Basic massage Lines, Signaling Points, Lom Lam Bong, Loom Phai Phat Tha Khat, Lom Prabh; p.282-328. (In Thai).
4. Patrakard P. The origin of Sen Prathan Sib. Journal of Thai Traditional & Alternative Medicine. 2012;10(1):4-10. (in Thai).
5. Cowen VS, Burkett L, Bredimus J, Evans DR, Lamey S, Neuhauser T, et al. A comparative study of Thai
massage and Swedish massage relative to physiological and psychological measures. Journal of Bodywork and
Movement Therapies. 2006;10(4):266-75.
6. Deewiset K, editors. Thai traditional massage handbook. 4th ed. Bangkok: Sam Chareon publishing; 2001. 336 p.
(in Thai)
7. Laohapand T, Jaturatamrong U, editors. Thai therapeutic massage (The basic massage). 1st ed. Bangkok:
Suphawanich publishing; 2011. 102 p. (in Thai)
8. Laohapand T, Jaturatamrong U, editors. Thai therapeutic massage (The signaling points massage). 1st ed. Bangkok: Suphawanich publishing; 2014. 206 p. (in Thai)
9. Chantawang N, Mairuae N, Khomwhutthiwhong K. Khongsri S, Raomad W, Lapyuneyong N. Anatomical
locations in the upper limb that correlate with basic massage lines and signaling points of Nuad Thai. Journal
of Thai Traditional & Alternative Medicine. 2017; 15(2):205-21.
10. Chantawang N, Mairuae N, Somana R. Anatomical locations in the lower limb that correlate with basic
massage lines and signaling points of court type Thai traditional Massage. Journal of Thai Traditional &
Alternative Medicine. 2015;13(2):123-33.
11. Supcharoen P, Limtiyayothin A, Manosil U. Court Type Thai Traditional Massage handbook. 1 st ed. Bangkok:
Sam Chareon publishing; 2006. 187 p. (in Thai)
12. Limtiyayothin A, Limtiyayothin S, Sookmitri K, Premkamon K, Wisessutthimon P, Worrathamphitak T,et al. Court Type Thai Traditional Massage handbook. 1 st ed. Bangkok: PK Max design publishing; 2015. 255 p. (in Thai)
13. Damapong P, Kanchanakhan N, Eungpinichpong W, Putthapitak P, Damapong P. A randomized controlled
trial on the effectiveness of court-type traditional Thai massage versus amitriptyline in patients with chronic
tension-type headache. Evidence-Based Complement and Alternative Medicine. 2015; Article ID 930175:1-12.
14. Thanakiatpinyo T, Suwanatrai S, Suwanatrai U, Khumkaew P, Wiwattamongkol D, Vannabhum M, etal. The efficacy of traditional Thai massage in decreasing spasticity in elderly stroke patients. Clin Interv Aging. 2014;9:1311-19.
15. Eungpinichpong W. The ten lines of traditional Thai massage and myofascial trigger points. Journal of
Medical technology and Physical therapy. 2004;16(1-3):8-13. (in Thai)
16. Chupawa P, Kanjanawanishkul K, Phudonpho P, Sappat E, Sansila P. A signal acupressure testing set for thai
therapeutic massage. Journal of Thai Traditional & Alternative Medicine. 2017;15(2):192-204. (in Thai)
17. Buttagat V, Eungpinichpong W, Chatchawan U, Arayawichanon P. Therapetic effects of traditional Thai
massage on pain, muscle tension and anxiety in pateints with scapulocostal syndrome: A randomized single
blinded pilot study. Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies. 2012;16:57-63.
18. Netchanok S, Wendy M, Marie C, Siobhan O. The effectiveness of Swedish massage and traditional Thai
massage in treating chronic low back pain: a review of the literature. Complementary Therapies in Clinical
Practice. 2012;18:227-34.
19. Buttagat V, Eungpinichpong W, Chatchawan, U, Kharmwan S. The immediate effects of traditional Thai
massage on heart rate variability and stress-related parameters in patients with back pain associated with
myofascial trigger points. Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies. 2011;15:15-23.
20. Chiranthanut N, Hanprasertpong N, Teekachuntean S. Thai massage, and Thai herbal compress versus oral
Ibuprofen in symptomatic treatment of osteoarthritis of the knee: A randomized controlled trial. BioMed
Research International. 2014; Article ID 490512:1-13.
21. Agur A.M.R, Dalley AF. Grantûs atlas of anatomy. 13th ed. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, China. 2012. 888 p.
22. Prithvi Raj P, Paradise LA. Myofascial pain syndrome and its treatment in low back pain. Semin Pain Med.
2004;2:167-74.
23. Rattanaphan S, Srichandr P. Mechanical model of traditional Thai massage for integrated healthcare. J Healthc Eng. 2015;6(2):193-12.
24. Stephanie C, Han BS, Harrison P. Myofascial pain and trigger-point Management. Regional Anesthesia. 1997;
22(1):89-01
25. Giamberardino MA, Affaitati G, Fabrizio A, Costantini R. Myofascial pain syndromes and their evaluation. Best
Practice & Research Clinical Rheumatology. 2011:25:185-98
26. Harris RE, Clauw DJ. The use of complementary medical therapies in the management of myofascial pain
disorders. Curr Pain Headache Rep. 2002;6(5):370-74.
27. Grieve R, Barnett S, Coghill N, Cramp F. The prevalence of latent myofascial trigger points and diagnostic criteria
of the triceps surae and upper trapezius: a cross sectional study. Physiotherapy. 2013;99(4):278-84.
28. Bennett R. Myofascial pain syndromes and their evaluation. Best Practice & Research Clinical Rheumatology. 2007;21(3):427-45.
29. Fernández-de-Las-Peñas C, Ge HY, Arendt-Nielsen L, Cuadrado ML, Pareja JA. Referred pain from trapezius
muscle trigger points shares similar characteristics with chronic tension type headache. Eur J Pain. 2007; 11(4):475-82.
30. Drake RL, Vogl AW, Mitchell AWM. Gray anatomy for student. 2nd ed. Churchill Livingstone, an imprint of
Elsevier Inc.; 2009. 1136 p.
31. Simons DG. Review of enigmatic MTrPs as a common cause of enigmatic musculoskeletal pain and
dysfunction. J Electromyogr Kinesiol. 2004;14:95-07.
32. Alvarez DJ, Rockwell PG. Trigger points: Diagnosis and management. American Family Physician. 2002:65(4):
653-60.