The Effect of Gender and Personality Differences in Young Adults on The Emotional Valence of Thai Words and Digitized Sounds

ผลของความแตกต่างระหว่างเพศและบุคลิกภาพที่มีต่อคำภาษาไทยและเสียงดิจิทัลที่เร้าอารมณ์ด้านความประทับใจในผู้ใหญ่ตอนต้น

  • พัชราภัณฑ์ ไชยสังข์ St Theresa International College
  • เสรี ชัดแช้ม Burapha University
  • พีร วงศ์อุปราช Burapha University
  • กนก พานทอง Burapha University
Keywords: Emotional Valence, Thai Word, Digitized Sound, Young Adult

Abstract

The different gender and personality of the person while looking at Thai words and listening to digitized sounds which stimulated emotional valence affected differently satisfied and unsatisfied emotions. This research is experimental research were to design experimental activities of looking at Thai words and listening to digitized sounds which stimulated emotional valence in young adults and to study the emotional valence concerning behavior studies between gender and personality of the participants while looking at Thai words and listening to digitized sounds. The participants were 80 students from Burapha University in the academic year 2017. The instruments used in this research consisted of the activities of looking at Thai words and listening to digitized sounds which stimulated emotional valence, Self-Assessment Manikin (SAM), and NeuroScan System. The data were analyzed by Two-Way ANOVA. The research results were as follows:            1. The activities of looking at Thai words and listening to digitized sounds consisted of 2 blocks; each block of 14 stimulus which were satisfied and unsatisfied emotions.

  1. 2. The young adults who has extravert personality showed the satisfied and unsatisfied emotions more than ambivert personality with satistically significant at .05 level.

            It may be concluded that there was emotional valence; satisfied and unsatisfied difference while young adults with different personality were looking at Thai words and listening to digitized sounds on emotional valence; satisfied and unsatisfied.

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Published
2019-01-11
Section
Research Articles; บทความวิจัย