Components of Health Literacy in Elderly Clubs, Metropolitan Bangkok

  • Vanida Durongrittichai Department of Community Nursing Program, Faculty of Nursing, Phetchaburi Rajabhat University
  • Kandavasee Maleevong Metropolitan Health and Wellness Institution, Department of Health
  • Chatchawal Wongsaree Department of Adult and Elderly Nursing Program, Faculty of Nursing, Suan Sunandha Rajabhat University
  • Hataichanok Buajalearn Department of Adult and Elderly Nursing Program, Faculty of Nursing, Nakhon Pathom Rajabhat University
Keywords: Component, Health literacy, Elderly club

Abstract

                The identification of components of health literacy in elderly clubs in Bangkok will enhance elderly members’ potential for self-care through the 4 Smart (Walk Brain Sleep Eat) program. This quantitative research will analyze health literacy components of present elderly clubs. The sample is 221elderly club committee. A self-report questionnaire was the research tool. Exploratory factor analysis was employed in analysis.

                The results show that the number of elderly clubs was the highest in North Bangkok. The average age of clubs was 14.53 years. Most clubs had less than 50 members. The legal qualification that clubs have for membership is the subsistence allowance. Four principal components were analyzed with a combined 56.43% of the total variance. These included: 1) communication that focuses on the achievement of health literacy with 44.335 % of the variance, 2) planning and driving health literacy with 7.990 % of the variance, 3) accessible and practical health messages with 6.197 % of the variance, and 4) directing indicators and continually developing health literacy organization with 5.545 % of the variance. The idea is to employ the elements identified to create an assessment form. The communication element focused on the achievement of health literacy through appropriately designed projects/activities. The variables or items of each principle component of health literacy should be studied in depth to better explain each level of variance. This research in other provinces should be repeated using Confirmatory Factor Analysis.

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Published
2021-01-15
How to Cite
Durongrittichai, V., Maleevong, K., Wongsaree, C., & Buajalearn, H. (2021). Components of Health Literacy in Elderly Clubs, Metropolitan Bangkok. Journal of Public Health Nursing, 34(3), 121-135. Retrieved from https://he01.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/phn/article/view/245347