Good Death as Perceived by Nursing Students

Main Article Content

Pongphol Khongsaman
Yupa Wongrostri
Chutarat Akkarawongvisiht

Abstract

This qualitative research aimed to describe good death as perceived by nursing students. Heidegger humanistic phenomenology was applied as research methodology. The participants were 15 nursing students who had experienced the loss of a family member while studying in the Faculty of Nursing. Data were collected using in-depth interviews with audio-recorded, and field observations. Data was analyzed using content analysis method of The Van Manan. The findings of this study are consisted of 7 themes: 1) having knowledge to be the door for good death, 2) having relationship to enhance the supporting and caring, 3) Creative communication and prepare with mutual understanding, 4) Live every moment with value and meaning, 5) Caring the body and mind by nothing suffering, 6) Psychological needs are meet, 7) Spiritual beliefs are not ignored.

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How to Cite
1.
Khongsaman P, Wongrostri Y, Akkarawongvisiht C. Good Death as Perceived by Nursing Students. J Royal Thai Army Nurses [nternet]. 2021Aug.31 [cited 2021Nov.30];22(2):95-104. vailable from: https://he01.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/JRTAN/article/view/251640
Section
Research Articles

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