A Development of Cognitive Flexibility Program Based on Acceptance and Commitment Therapy in Primary School Students

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Chatchaya Nusonthara
Juthamas Haenjohn
Sasinan Sirithadakunlaphat

Abstract

The aims of this research were to develop the Cognitive Flexibility Training Program based on Acceptance and Commitment Therapy in primary school students (CFT-ACT), and to test the effectiveness of the developed CFT-ACT program. The sample consisted of 60 primary school students, with the age between 9-11 years old. The sample was randomized by using random assignment and matching in to groups: an experimental and a control group, each group composed 30 students (Boys = 15, girls = 15). The research instruments were; 1) the CFT-ACT program, which was developed by the researcher based on acceptance and commitment therapy and cognitive flexibility training. And child development concept. It composed of 6 sessions; and 90 minutes in each session; for a total of three weeks, and 2) the Wisconsin card sorting (WCST-64). The experimental group received the CFT-ACT program and the control group joined the regular school’s activities during the same period. The assessments were done in 2 phases: pretest and posttest. The data were analyzed by a t-test.


The results revealed that the experimental group had the mean score of cognitive flexibility in the posttest higher than the pretest with statistically significant at .05 level. Additionally, they had the mean score of cognitive flexibility higher than those in the control group in the posttest with statistically significant at .05 level.

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1.
Nusonthara C, Haenjohn J, Sirithadakunlaphat S. A Development of Cognitive Flexibility Program Based on Acceptance and Commitment Therapy in Primary School Students. J Royal Thai Army Nurses [nternet]. 2021Sep.5 [cited 2021Nov.28];22(2):278-85. vailable from: https://he01.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/JRTAN/article/view/242365
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Research Articles

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