Case study of the results of Applied Behavioral Analysis: Incidental Teaching by parents to speech and language performance of Autistic child age 2:4 year Incidental teaching and speech/ language development in ASD

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Pornpiriya Apipornjeerapat

Abstract

Incidental teaching ( IT) is a strategy that uses the principles of Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) to provide structured learning opportunities in the natural environment using the child’s interests and natural motivation. This technique had five steps 1.Watching for the child to initiate (watch) 2.Remove the desire object (remove), 3.Ask for request (ask),4.Pause for 10-30 second, 5.Give the reword (object in steps 2).Report outcomes presented that parent -child interaction with implement IT technique over  6 month period significantly improved the speech and language skills of children with ASD aged 2:4 years. The child able to produce almost all Thai phonetic sounds except / ph/ and/ th/ and had MLU increasing from unable to calculated into 1.89 at the end of the study. This preliminary study, suggest further investigation, including a standard research study would yield valuable clinical findings.

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How to Cite
Apipornjeerapat, P. (2022). Case study of the results of Applied Behavioral Analysis: Incidental Teaching by parents to speech and language performance of Autistic child age 2:4 year: Incidental teaching and speech/ language development in ASD. International Journal of Child Development and Mental Health, 10(1), 50–56. Retrieved from https://he01.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/cdmh/article/view/246239
Section
Case reports

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