Behavioral Variant of Frontotmeporal Dementia (bvFTD) and Developing of Mild Behavioral Impairment (MBI) Concept

  • ประวีณ์นุช เพ็ญภาสกานต์ Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University
  • พัทธมน เจริญรัตน์ Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University
  • นันทิกา อนันต์ถาวรวงศ์ Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University
  • ภาพันธ์ ไทยพิสุทธิกุล Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University
Keywords: behavioral symptoms; psychiatric symptoms; frontotemporal dementia

Abstract

Frontotemporal dementia, especially behavioral variant (bvFTD), is a common
cause of dementia. BvFTD symptoms are overlap with psychiatric symptoms and may
lead to diagnostic difficulties. Common symptoms are early apathy, early behavioral
disinhibition, early loss of sympathy/empathy, early perseverative/compulsive behavior
and hyperorality/dietary change. It is necessary to use both non-pharmacological and
pharmacological methods for behavioral management, since Acetylcholinesterase
inhibitor and Memantine are not effective. Behavioral management in bvFTD usually
focuses on antidepressant and atypical antipsychotic and always considers possible
adverse effects of those medications.
Nowadays, experts try to set diagnostic criteria for patients who presented with
neuropsychiatric symptoms prior to cognitive problems, which is called mild behavioral
impairment (MBI). This attempt would help identify patients in pre-stage dementia, follow
a long-term cohort and prevention process, especially if disease-modifying agent is
available in the future.

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Published
2019-03-28
How to Cite
เพ็ญภาสกานต์ป., เจริญรัตน์พ., อนันต์ถาวรวงศ์น., & ไทยพิสุทธิกุลภ. (2019). Behavioral Variant of Frontotmeporal Dementia (bvFTD) and Developing of Mild Behavioral Impairment (MBI) Concept. Journal of the Psychiatric Association of Thailand, 64(1), 99-112. Retrieved from https://he01.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/JPAT/article/view/180538

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