Effects of traditional games-based learning programs on social distancing to prevent the spread of Coronavirus Disease 2019

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Nutnicha Srilamai
Nattha Wattanaviroj
Watcharin Changpradap
Sompratthana Sudjainark
Boontuan Wattanakul

Abstract

Background: The Coronavirus 2019 pandemic puts schools at a high risk of disease outbreaks. Social distancing competency though school health education is important for students as a prevention method for the spread of Coronavirus 2019.


Objectives: To determine effects of the game-based learning program Integrated Traditional Games about Social Distancing on the spread of Coronavirus 2019 prevention of primary school-aged students between baseline, at the end of the program, and one month after completion of the program.


Methods: A 0ne-group pre-posttest, time series quasi-experimental study was conducted in a primary school with 152 grade 6 students. The participants completed the game-based learning (GBL) program, and a social distancing questionnaire for 3 times: at baseline (O1), after finishing the GBL program (O2), and a repeated measure at 1 month after completion of the program (O3). The GBL program of intervention consisted of 3 traditional games: whisper cans, snake and ladders, and a puzzle. The social distancing questionnaire included demographic data (5-items), knowledge (15-items), attitude (8-items), and practice (12-items) about social distancing. The coefficient of reliabilities were .80, .82 and .84, respectively. One-way ANOVA with repeated measures was used for data analysis.


Results: Scores on knowledge (F=323.83, df 1.07, h2=0.683), attitude (F=145.33, df 1.07, h2=0.490), and practice (F=115.16, df 1.08, h2=0.433) about social distancing increased significantly (p< .01) from baseline. Pairwise comparisons revealed that all of the mean differences increased significantly (p < .001).


Conclusions: Schools should consider applying traditional game-based learning activities in order to improve social distancing competency in response to the Coronavirus 2019 pandemic.

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How to Cite
Srilamai, N., Wattanaviroj, N., Changpradap, W., Sudjainark, S., & Wattanakul, B. (2021). Effects of traditional games-based learning programs on social distancing to prevent the spread of Coronavirus Disease 2019 . JOURNAL OF HEALTH SCIENCE RESEARCH, 15(2), 25-36. Retrieved from https://he01.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/JHR/article/view/248409
Section
นิพนธ์ต้นฉบับ (Original Articles)
Author Biographies

Nutnicha Srilamai, Pediatric Nursing Department, Boromarajonani College of Nursing, Chonburi, Praboromarajchanok Institute, Thailand

Pediatric Nursing Department, Boromarajonani College of Nursing, Chonburi, Praboromarajchanok Institute, Thailand

Nattha Wattanaviroj, Pediatric Nursing Department, Boromarajonani College of Nursing, Chonburi, Praboromarajchanok Institute, Thailand

Pediatric Nursing Department, Boromarajonani College of Nursing, Chonburi, Praboromarajchanok Institute, Thailand

Watcharin Changpradap, Community Health Nursing Department, Boromarajonani College of Nursing, Chonburi, Praboromarajchanok Institute, Thailand

Community Health Nursing Department, Boromarajonani College of Nursing, Chonburi, Praboromarajchanok Institute, Thailand

Sompratthana Sudjainark, Pediatric Nursing Department, Boromarajonani College of Nursing, Chonburi, Praboromarajchanok Institute, Thailand

Pediatric Nursing Department, Boromarajonani College of Nursing, Chonburi, Praboromarajchanok Institute, Thailand

Boontuan Wattanakul, Community Health Nursing Department, Boromarajonani College of Nursing, Chonburi, Praboromarajchanok Institute, Thailand

Community Health Nursing Department, Boromarajonani College of Nursing, Chonburi, Praboromarajchanok Institute, Thailand

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