Pathogenic bacteria and fungi from bat guano in restricted access caves, Kanchanaburi Province

Authors

  • Watcharamat Muangkaew Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Faculty of Tropical Medicine, Mahidol University
  • Thitaree Doungdun Department of Medical Technology, Faculty of Allied Health Sciences, Burapha University
  • Juntima Iampornchai Department of Medical Technology, Faculty of Allied Health Sciences, Burapha University
  • Rattiporn Tipprasert Department of Medical Technology, Faculty of Allied Health Sciences, Burapha University
  • Risa Kenpun Department of Medical Technology, Faculty of Allied Health Sciences, Burapha University
  • Marut Tangwattanachuleeporn Department of Medical Technology, Faculty of Allied Health Sciences, Burapha University
  • Suphat Prasopsin Research Academic Supports Division, Mahidol university Kanchanaburi Campus
  • Yudthana Samung Department of Medical Entomology, Faculty of Tropical Medicine, Mahidol University
  • Panyawat Boontanom Educational Technology and Art Unit, Dean Office, Faculty of Tropical Medicine, Mahidol University
  • Natthapaninee Thanomsridetchai Department of Medical Technology, Faculty of Allied Health Sciences, Burapha University

Keywords:

Bat guano, MALDI-TOF MS, Bacteria, Fungi, Cave, Kanchanaburi province

Abstract

Bats serve as carriers for various pathogens, with bat guano acting as a reservoir for microorganisms that can spread to the environment and cause infectious diseases in humans. This study aims to investigate the bacteria and fungi present in bat guano. Samples of bat guano were collected from restricted access cave areas and diluted using 10-fold dilutions into culture media. Initially, the researchers focused on studying fungi in bat guano, using Sabouraud Dextrose Agar supplemented with Chloramphenicol, and incubating at 37°C for 48-72 hours. Colonies were isolated, and pure cultures were obtained for analysis using MALDI-TOF MS. No fungal growth was observed at dilutions of 10-4 to 10-7, but growth occurred at dilutions of 10-1, 10-2, and 10-3. Additionally, the variety of culture media was expanded to include Sabouraud Dextrose Agar, Potato Dextrose Agar, and Malt Extract Agar, supplemented with Chloramphenicol, and incubated at 25 and 37°C. Analysis revealed 28 isolates after selective culturing, comprising both bacteria and fungi. MALDI-TOF MS identified 9 bacterial isolates, including Providencia stuartii, Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus amyloliquefaciens, Alcaligenes faecalis, Proteus mirabilis, Ochrobactrum intermedium, Achromobacter xylosoxidans, and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. One fungal isolate was identified as Aspergillus versicolor. Unidentified isolates underwent DNA sequencing, revealing Cladosporium perangustum. This study highlights that the majority of microorganisms present in bat guano are naturally occurring bacteria, some of which are known to cause infectious diseases in humans. These findings contribute to further research and can be used to warn individuals at risk of bat guano exposure.

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Published

2024-04-30

How to Cite

1.
Muangkaew W, Doungdun T, Iampornchai J, Tipprasert R, Kenpun R, Tangwattanachuleeporn M, Prasopsin S, Samung Y, Boontanom P, Thanomsridetchai N. Pathogenic bacteria and fungi from bat guano in restricted access caves, Kanchanaburi Province. J Med Health Sci [Internet]. 2024 Apr. 30 [cited 2024 Jul. 22];31(1):32-44. Available from: https://he01.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/jmhs/article/view/267770

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Original article (บทความวิจัย)