Prevalence of Violence among High School Students in Hat Yai Municipality, Southern Thailand: ICAST-CI Thai Version Study

Authors

  • Sasivara Boonrusmee Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai, Songkhla 90110, Thailand.
  • Tansit Saengkaew Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai, Songkhla 90110, Thailand.
  • Nannapat Pruphetkaew Epidemiology Unit, Faculty of Medicine, Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai, Songkhla 90110, Thailand.
  • Somchit Jaruratanasirikul Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai, Songkhla 90110, Thailand.

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.31584/jhsmr.2018.36.4.20

Keywords:

physical violence, psychological violence, school violence, sexual violence victimization

Abstract

Objective: To determine the prevalence and risk factors of school violence among Thai high school students using a Thai version of the International Society for the Prevention of Child Abuse and Neglect (ISPCAN) Child Abuse Screening Tool-Children: Institute Version (ICAST-CI).
Material and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted at two high schools in Hat Yai municipality, Songkhla, southern Thailand with 480 students. Univariate logistic regression analysis was used to assess the risk factors associated with school violence.
Results: Overall, 88.8% of the students reported experiencing violence at school in their lifetimes. The prevalences of psychological, physical and sexual violence were 84.0%, 66.9% and 30.6%, respectively. The most commonly reported violence patterns among each form of violence were swearing (87.8%), slapping on hand/arm (66.4%), and showing pornography (67.3%), respectively. Students with good school performance tended to report psychological violence [odds ratio (OR)=3.03, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.13-8.07] whereas students aged >15 years were less likely to report physical violence (OR=0.47, 95% CI=0.31-0.71). Sexual violence was reported more among male students (OR=1.71, 95% CI= 1.12-2.61) and students aged >15 years regardless of gender (OR=1.58, 95% CI=1.04-2.39). Students were more likely to be reported as a perpetrator than teachers in most patterns of violence.
Conclusion: The prevalence of school violence among high school students in Hat Yai municipality, southern Thailand, is significant. and the patterns of violence are similar to other ICAST-CI studies. Violence at school should be recognized as a serious problem, and preventive measures should be implemented nationwide. 

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Published

2018-09-07

How to Cite

1.
Boonrusmee S, Saengkaew T, Pruphetkaew N, Jaruratanasirikul S. Prevalence of Violence among High School Students in Hat Yai Municipality, Southern Thailand: ICAST-CI Thai Version Study. J Health Sci Med Res [Internet]. 2018 Sep. 7 [cited 2022 Oct. 5];36(4):247-5. Available from: https://he01.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/jhsmr/article/view/108168

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Original Article