Factors associated with elevated blood lead levels among children in two villages at reservoir of Bhumibol Dam, Sam Ngao district, Tak province, 2019

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Witaya Swaddiwudhipong
Thassanee Rodsung
Thinnakorn Phuphawieng
Nipaporn Deetukprakarn
Siriluk Salikadong
Vichaichard Chuchoden
Nathaporn Poochancharoen
Chutima Chakkaew

Abstract

Blood lead level has widely been used to indicate lead exposure in humans. This report presents blood lead levels (BLLs) and factors associated with elevated BLLs (> 10 µg/dl) among children aged 1-14 years old in two villages at reservoir of Bhumibol Dam, Sam Ngao District, Tak Province, 2019. All target children were identified and their parents were interviewed about demographic characteristics and possible lead exposure. Body weight of each participant was measured to determine nutritional status, weight for age. Venous whole blood was collected for measurements of complete blood count and a BLL. Case investigation was additionally carried out among those in the highest BLL group. A total of 101 children were screened for BLLs. The mean age of the study children was about 8.6 years old. The proportions of boys and girls were similar. About 39.6% of the children had BLLs of 5-9.9 µg/dl and 14.9% had ≥ 10 µg/dl. Factors significantly associated with elevated BLLs included being a boy, older age and history of exposure to lead melting. All children with history of lead melting exposure were boys of older age. Children with low weight-for-age had slightly higher BLLs than those with normal/over weight-for-age. Those with anemia had slightly higher BLLs than those with no anemia. It is essential to educate people, particularly school boys, in the areas about lead toxicity, exposure, and prevention, regularly follow-up children with high BLLs, and manage those with low weight for age and anemia.

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How to Cite
Swaddiwudhipong , W. ., Rodsung , T. ., Phuphawieng , T. ., Deetukprakarn , N. ., Salikadong , S., Chuchoden , V. ., Poochancharoen , N. ., & Chakkaew , C. . (2020). Factors associated with elevated blood lead levels among children in two villages at reservoir of Bhumibol Dam, Sam Ngao district, Tak province, 2019. Journal of Medical and Public Health Region 4, 11(1), 59–67. Retrieved from https://he01.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/JMPH4/article/view/248387
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Original Articles

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