Medication Errors in Ready-to-Administer Injectable Admixtures Compounded by Pharmacy Personnel: A Study of Hospitals in Northern Thailand

Authors

  • Pitchayut Rattanatanyapat University of Phayao Hospital, School of Medicine, University of Phayao, Thailand https://orcid.org/0000-0001-7844-921X
  • Chutima Chaiwut Maharaj Nakorn Chiang Mai Hospital, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Thailand
  • Ong-art Maneemai Department of Pharmaceutical Care, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Phayao, Pharmacoepidemiology, Social and Administrative Pharmacy (P-SAP) Research Unit, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Phayao, Thailand https://orcid.org/0000-0002-2251-7997
  • Kridsana Karnman Department of Pharmaceutical Care, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Phayao, Thailand
  • Jiraprapa Decha Department of Pharmaceutical Care, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Phayao, Thailand
  • Sudthida Takongkaew Department of Pharmaceutical Care, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Phayao, Thailand
  • Muntana Duangmon Department of Pharmaceutical Care, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Phayao, Thailand
  • Kunwara Ob-un Chemotherapy Ward, Chiang Rai Prachanukroh Hospital, Thailand https://orcid.org/0000-0001-9074-2451

Keywords:

medication errors, ready-to-administer injection, pharmacist

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine the number, types, and severity of medication errors in ready-to-administer injectable admixtures compounded by pharmacy personnel in northern Thai hospitals.
METHODS This retrospective descriptive study was conducted in six hospitals in northern Thailand. Data were gathered from hospital incidence reports over the three-year period 2017-2019. The following data were extracted from each report: stage of error, medication involved, care setting, and severity of error. The National Coordinating Council for Medication Error Reporting and Prevention index was used to categorize the severity of the medication errors. Results are presented as number and percentage.
RESULTS The total number of medication error events in the six hospitals was 405, classified as transcribing (n=59, 14.5%), pre-dispensing (n=217, 53.6%) and dispensing errors (n=129, 31.9%). The most frequent type of pre-dispensing errors was inappropriate techniques in medication compounding (n= 54, 13.3%). Almost all the medication errors were of severity level B (errors resulting in no harm to patients) (n=398, 98.3%). The most frequent errors were reported in antineoplastic agents (n=373, 92.1%).
CONCLUSIONS The great majority of medication errors were pre-dispensing errors with a low level of severity. The provision of strategies to prevent medication errors is necessary for patient safety.

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Published

2022-07-01

How to Cite

1.
Rattanatanyapat P, Chaiwut C, Maneemai O- art, Karnman K, Decha J, Takongkaew S, Duangmon M, Ob-un K. Medication Errors in Ready-to-Administer Injectable Admixtures Compounded by Pharmacy Personnel: A Study of Hospitals in Northern Thailand. BSCM [Internet]. 2022 Jul. 1 [cited 2024 Apr. 20];61(3):127-34. Available from: https://he01.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/CMMJ-MedCMJ/article/view/257849

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Original Article