Correlation with thoracoabdominal mobility with pulmonary function in healthy individuals

Authors

  • Sukalya Kritsnakriengkrai Division of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Physical Therapy, Srinakharinwirot University
  • Kamonwon Ngoenngarm Division of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Physical Therapy, Srinakharinwirot University
  • Sopida Boonkamyuang Division of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Physical Therapy, Srinakharinwirot University
  • Phatnarat Artornkijawat
  • Jularat Poonnarong Division of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Physical Therapy, Srinakharinwirot University
  • Phontita Phetseengam
  • Aissaree Paveensornchai Division of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Physical Therapy, Srinakharinwirot University

Keywords:

thoracoabdominal mobility, pulmonary function, predicting

Abstract

Abstract
Chest wall mobility is commonly used for evaluation in clinical practice, but research of the correlations between thoracoabdominal mobility and pulmonary function are limited. The objectives of this study were to investigate the relationship between thoracoabdominal mobility and pulmonary function in healthy adults, and to create an equation for predicting the pulmonary functions of the thoracoabdominal mobility measurement. All of the healthy participants measured the axillary, thoracic and abdominal cirtometry using cloth tape. Forced vital capacity(FVC) and forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) were measured to determine pulmonary function. The Pearson’s correlation coefficient(r) was used to evaluate the correlation between thoracoabdominal mobility and pulmonary functions. Multiple linear regression was used to create the equation to predict pulmonary function. There were 119 participants, with 56 males and 63 females. The results revealed that axillary cirtometry was significantly positively correlated with FVC (r=0.229, p<0.05) and thoracic cirtometry was significantly positively correlated with FVC and FEV1 (r=0.307, p<0.01 and r=0.353, p<0.01, respectively). The equations to predict the value of pulmonary function were as follows: FVC (%predicted) = 87.18 + 1.86 Thoracic cirtometry (r=0.307, r2=0.094, p<0.001, SEE=10.70), FEV1 (%predicted) = 87.519 + 2.147 Thoracic cirtometry (r=0.353, r2=0.125, p<0.001, SEE=10.55).

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References

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Published

2021-12-30

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Section

Original Article (บทความวิจัย)