Effectiveness of Innovation Basic Life Support Training Devices to Layperson: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Authors

  • Wiput Laosuksri Department of Emergency Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Mueang, Chiang Mai 50200, Thailand.
  • Boriboon Chenthanakij Department of Emergency Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Mueang, Chiang Mai 50200, Thailand.
  • Krongkarn Sutham Department of Emergency Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Mueang, Chiang Mai 50200, Thailand.
  • Wetchayan Rangsri Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Chiang Mai University, Mueang, Chiang Mai 50200, Thailand.
  • Radom Pongvuthitham Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Chiang Mai University, Mueang, Chiang Mai 50200, Thailand.
  • Chaiy Rungsiyakull Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Chiang Mai University, Mueang, Chiang Mai 50200, Thailand.
  • Thawan Sucharitakul Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Chiang Mai University, Mueang, Chiang Mai 50200, Thailand.
  • Navadon Khunlertgit Department of Computer Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Chiang Mai University, Mueang, Chiang Mai 50200, Thailand.
  • Borwon Wittayachamnankul Department of Emergency Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Mueang, Chiang Mai 50200, Thailand.

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.31584/jhsmr.2021856

Keywords:

automated external defibrillator, basic life support, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, innovation, training

Abstract

Objectives: The use of a cardiopulmonary resuscitation feedback device and automated external defibrillator trainer is beneficial in basic life support (BLS) training. Nevertheless, Thailand lacks these devices in BLS support training. This study aimed to compare the efficacy of the Chiang Mai BLS training devices with conventional training devices in BLS training for laypeople.

Material and Methods: A randomized controlled trial was conducted to compare the efficacy of the Chiang Mai device group with the conventional device group, by assessing the theory and practical examination scores of the participants; who were adult, laypeople attending the BLS provider course endorsed by the Thai Resuscitation Council. Evaluating instructors were blinded from both groups of participants.

Results: A total of 60 adult, laypeople participants were divided into two groups: 32 and 28 participants of the Chiang Mai device group and conventional device group, respectively. Overall examination scores of included participants were very high. The participants in the Chiang Mai device group had a higher median score of multiple-choice question assessment [9.0/9.0 (8.5-9.0) vs 8.5/9.0 (8.0-9.0) points, p-value=0.134] as well as a higher median score of practical examination [26.0/26.0 (24.3-26.0) vs 25.0/26.0 (24.0-26.0) points, p-value=0.278] when compared to those using conventional BLS training devices. However, there was no statistical significance between both groups.

Conclusion: The effectiveness of the Chiang Mai BLS training device in basic life support training for adult laypeople is comparable to conventional BLS training devices.

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Published

2022-07-22

How to Cite

1.
Laosuksri W, Chenthanakij B, Sutham K, Rangsri W, Pongvuthitham R, Rungsiyakull C, Sucharitakul T, Khunlertgit N, Wittayachamnankul B. Effectiveness of Innovation Basic Life Support Training Devices to Layperson: A Randomized Controlled Trial. J Health Sci Med Res [Internet]. 2022 Jul. 22 [cited 2023 Jan. 28];40(4):449-58. Available from: https://he01.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/jhsmr/article/view/257762

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Original Article