Prevalence of Urinary Incontinence Among Hospital Based and Community Dwelling Women: A Survey

Authors

  • Shamima Islam Nipa Department of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Associated Medical Sciences, Chiang Mai University, Mueang, Chiang Mai 50200, Thailand.
  • Thanyaluck Sriboonreung Department of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Associated Medical Sciences, Chiang Mai University, Mueang, Chiang Mai 50200, Thailand.
  • Aatit Paungmali Department of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Associated Medical Sciences, Chiang Mai University, Mueang, Chiang Mai 50200, Thailand.
  • Chailert Phongnarisorn Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Mueang, Chiang Mai 50200, Thailand.

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.31584/jhsmr.2021837

Keywords:

community dwelling women, musculo-skeletal conditions, prevalence, urinary incontinence

Abstract

Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of urinary incontinence (UI) among hospital based patients and community dwelling women.

Material and Methods: This prevalence survey was conducted with 334 respondents, using the Medical Epidemiological and Social Aspects of Aging and Incontinence Severity Index questionnaire.

Results: UI was highly prevalent in hospital patients; 34.1% (n=57) compared to community dwelling women; 10.2% (n=17). This study’s findings determined a significant association of age along with the severity of UI among hospital based women, considering a p-value=0.030. In addition, this study illustrated a substantial association of musculo-skeletal conditions along with the severity of UI among hospital based women considering a p-value=0.018. Consequently, there was a significant association of musculo-skeletal conditions along with the severity of UI in community dwelling women (p-value=0.040).

Conclusion: Hospital based patients with musculoskeletal conditions predominantly suffered with UI more so than the community dwelling women. Further studies should be conducted to establish the reasons for the difference in ratios of UI among hospital based and community dwelling women.

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References

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Published

2021-09-03

How to Cite

1.
Islam Nipa S, Sriboonreung T, Paungmali A, Phongnarisorn C. Prevalence of Urinary Incontinence Among Hospital Based and Community Dwelling Women: A Survey. J Health Sci Med Res [Internet]. 2021 Sep. 3 [cited 2022 Oct. 4];40(3):293-9. Available from: https://he01.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/jhsmr/article/view/255389

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