Effects of Saraphi (Mammea siamensis) flower extracts on cell proliferation and Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 expression in leukemic EoL-1 cell line

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Rungkarn Sangkaruk
Singkome Tima
Methee Rungrojsakul
Sawitree Chiampanichayakul
Songyot Anuchapreeda

Abstract

Introduction: Saraphi (Mammea siamensis) is a medicinal herb used in Thai traditional medicine. Its flowers was traditionally used for heart tonics, fever, and enhancement of appetite in Thailand. FLT3 (Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3) is a prognostic marker for acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) and it can control leukemic cell proliferation.

Objective: To investigate the cytotoxic effects of crude ethanolic extract (EtOH) and fractional extracts including hexane (Hex), ethyl acetate (EtOAc), and methanol (MeOH) fractions from M. siamensis flowers and to determine the effects on FLT3 expression in EoL-1 cells.

Materials and methods: Flowers of M. siamensis were firstly extracted using ethanol. The EtOH extract was further fractionated by Hex, EtOAc, and MeOH, respectively. MTT assay was performed to evaluate cytotoxic effects of each extract. The effective extracts were used to determine their inhibitory effects on FLT3 protein expression by Western blot analysis. Total cell number was determined by trypan blue dye exclusion assay.

Results: Hex fraction demonstrated the strongest cytotoxic activity with IC50 of 3.8±0.8 µg/mL. Moreover, FLT3 protein expression and total cell numbers of Hex fraction treated EoL-1 cells were decreased in a time- and dose-dependent manner at the concentration of IC20 value.

Conclusion: The Hex fraction from M. siamensis flowers inhibited cell proliferation via the suppression of FLT3 expression. It could be suggested that Hex extraction of M. siamensis flower is a promising approach for new anti-leukemic drug candidates.
Introduction: Saraphi (Mammea siamensis) is a medicinal herb used in Thai traditional medicine. Its flowers was traditionally used for heart tonics, fever, and enhancement of appetite in Thailand. FLT3 (Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3) is a prognostic marker for acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) and it can control leukemic cell proliferation.


Bull Chiang Mai Assoc Med Sci 2016; 49(2): 286-293. Doi: 10.14456/jams.2016.19

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How to Cite
Sangkaruk, R., Tima, S., Rungrojsakul, M., Chiampanichayakul, S., & Anuchapreeda, S. (2016). Effects of Saraphi (Mammea siamensis) flower extracts on cell proliferation and Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 expression in leukemic EoL-1 cell line. Journal of Associated Medical Sciences, 49(2), 286. Retrieved from https://he01.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/bulletinAMS/article/view/59889
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Research Articles

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