Utility of anthropometric indicators of body fat thresholds for detecting metabolic syndrome risk in North Central Nigerian youth

Main Article Content

Danladi Ibrahim Musa
Agbana Busayo Emmanuel
Mohammed N. Abubakar
Sule Tanko Onotu
Charles E. Dikki
Olasupo Stephen Adeniyi

Abstract

The diagnostic performance of anthropometric indicators of obesity that better predicts metabolic syndrome (MetS) risk in Nigerian adolescents is not clear. This study examined the diagnostic precision of body fat indicators that would better identify the risk of MetS in north central Nigerian adolescents, aged 11 to 19 years. This cross-sectional study comprised 206 adolescent boys (101) and girls (105) from Kogi East, North Central Nigeria. Participants were evaluated for five indices of body fat, fasting blood glucose, triglycerides, high density lipoprotein cholesterol and systolic blood pressure. Receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) analysis was used to determine the predictive capacities of the body fat proxies to detect the risk of MetS. The prevalence of MetS was 5.8% (Girls=3.4%; Boys=2.4%). Waist circumference (WC), waist-to-height ratio (WHtR) and conicity index (C-index) had significant (p<0.001) areas under the curve (AUC), with WC (AUC: girls=91.7%; boys=91.3%) as the best body fat indicator for identifying risk of MetS in both sexes. Relative fat (%Fat) and body mass index (BMI) had no discriminatory capacities to detect MetS risk in participants. This study has demonstrated that WC is the best tool for identifying MetS risk in Nigerian adolescents, while WHtR and C-index are reasonable second and third choices, respectively. It is recommended that public health professionals should use WC for preliminary screening for risk of MetS in Nigerian adolescents prior to referral for confirmation and medical follow-up.

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Article Details

Section
Short Report
Author Biographies

Danladi Ibrahim Musa, Department of Human Kinetics and Health Education, Kogi State University, Anyigba, Nigeria

Department of Human Kinetics and Health Education, Kogi State University, Anyigba, Nigeria

Agbana Busayo Emmanuel, Department of Community Medicine, College of Health Sciences, Kogi State University, Anyigba, Nigeria

Department of Community Medicine, College of Health Sciences, Kogi State University, Anyigba, Nigeria

Mohammed N. Abubakar, Department of Human Kinetics and Health Education, Kogi State University, Anyigba, Nigeria

Department of Human Kinetics and Health Education, Kogi State University, Anyigba, Nigeria

Sule Tanko Onotu, Department of Human Kinetics and Health Education, Kogi State University, Anyigba, Nigeria

Department of Human Kinetics and Health Education, Kogi State University, Anyigba, Nigeria

Charles E. Dikki, Department of Human Kinetics and Health Education, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria

Department of Human Kinetics and Health Education, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria

Olasupo Stephen Adeniyi, Department of Physiology, Faculty of Basic and Allied Medical Sciences, Benue State University, Makurdi,Nigeria

Department of Physiology, Faculty of Basic and Allied Medical Sciences, Benue State University, Makurdi, Nigeria

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