Development of indicator of the personal initiative behavior of head nurses at private hospitals in Thailand

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chutchavarn wongsaree
Netchanok Sritoomma
Suchittra Luangamomlert

Abstract

Personal initiative behavior of head nurses at private hospitals in Thailand is an essential tool for highly efficient performance at the individual and organizational levels,  leading to competitive advantage. This study aimed to develop indicators of Personal Initiative Behavior (PIB)  for head nurses in private hospitals in Thailand. This study used a quantitative research to develop the PIB scale based on the personal initiative concept of Frese and Fay (2001). The samples were head nurses who worked in private hospitals accredited with international quality standards in Thailand. This study used 7 steps of Brislin’s method for scale development. The content validity was tested by 7 experts in the nursing management field with a CVI at 1.0.  The internal consistency reliability with Cronbach’s alpha coefficient for Personal initiative components; self-starting, pro-active and persistent were .73, .78 and .80, respectively. Overall reliability was .08, and testing of the construct validity was performed by using exploratory factor analysis and confirmatory factor analysis with 200 head nurses at private hospitals. The PIB consisted of three components with nine indicators: 1) Self-starting behavior composed of 3 indicators (factor loading = .88), 2) Pro-active behavior composed of 3 indicators (factor loading = .92), and 3) Persistent behavior composed of 3 indicators (factor loading = .83). The developed instrument was congruent with empirical data (P-value = .893, chi square = 15.8, df= 24, 2 /df = .660, GFI = .983, AGFI = .968, RMR = .011, RMSEA = .000, CFI = 1.000).  Cronbach’s alpha coefficient for reliability after construct validity for overall reliability was .80. The developed indicators can be used to measure the level of personal initiative behavior of head nurses in private hospitals particularly in the areas of self-starting behavior, pro-active behavior and persistent behavior, by having a good knowledge of innovation management and creativity. 

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Original Articles
Author Biographies

chutchavarn wongsaree, Ph.D. Candidate in Nursing Management program, Christian University of Thailand, Nakhon Pathom, Thailand

Ph.D. Candidate in Nursing Management program, Christian University of Thailand, Nakhon Pathom, Thailand

Netchanok Sritoomma, College of Nursing, Christian University of Thailand, Nakhon Pathom, Thailand

College of Nursing, Christian University of Thailand, Nakhon Pathom, Thailand

Suchittra Luangamomlert, College of Nursing, Christian University of Thailand, Nakhon Pathom, Thailand

College of Nursing, Christian University of Thailand, Nakhon Pathom, Thailand

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