Effects of a safe sex program for increasing health literacy intention and practice to prevent pregnancy among undergraduates in Thailand

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Saowanee Thongnopakun
Tepanata Pumpaibool
Sawitree Visanuyothin
Yuvadee Rodjarkpai
Mereerat Manwong

Abstract

This quasi-experimental study aimed to determine the effects of a safe sex program for increasing health literacy, intention and practice to prevent pregnancy among undergraduates in Thailand from September 2017 to January 2018. Multistage sampling was employed resulting in 73 undergraduates (36 in the experiment and 37 in the control). Data were collected by self-administered questionnaire. The experiment included a 20-week safe sex program. Statistics used to analyze data were descriptive statistics and analytical statistics; chi-square test, Fisher’s exact test, paired samples t-test, independent samples t-test, Mann-Whitney U test and generalized estimating equations. The mean difference for health literacy scores and the practice scores obtained for the experiment were significantly higher than that of the control (p-value = 0.002, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.43–15.47 and p-value = 0.004, 95% CI: 0.27– 1.45). However, the mean difference of scores of intentions regarding condom and Emergency contraceptive pills (ECPs) were not statistically significant  between experiment and control. This study indicated that the intervention increased health literacy and practice among undergraduates. These findings may present a novel practical program to prevent teenage pregnancy in this population.

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Original Articles
Author Biographies

Saowanee Thongnopakun, Faculty of Public Health, Burapha University, Chon Buri, Thailand,

Faculty of Public Health, Burapha University, Chon Buri, Thailand,

Tepanata Pumpaibool, College of Public Health Sciences, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand

College of Public Health Sciences, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand

Sawitree Visanuyothin, Maharat Nakhon Ratchasima Hospital, Nakhon Ratchasima, Thailand

Maharat Nakhon Ratchasima Hospital, Nakhon Ratchasima, Thailand

Yuvadee Rodjarkpai, Faculty of Public Health, Burapha University, Chon Buri, Thailand

Faculty of Public Health, Burapha University, Chon Buri, Thailand

Mereerat Manwong, College of Medicine and Public Health, Ubon Ratchathani University, Ubon Ratchathani, Thailand

College of Medicine and Public Health, Ubon Ratchathani University, Ubon Ratchathani, Thailand

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