Health Risk Assessment and Bioaccumulation of Heavy metals in Surface Water and Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) from Huai Luang Basin Udon Thani Province

Main Article Content

Atcharaporn Somparn
Kanittha Pamonpol
Natsima Tokhun

Abstract

Contamination of heavy metal in aquatic ecosystems has the potential to cause toxicity and accumulating in aquatic ecosystem. Human consumption of heavy-metal contaminated water or aquatic animals can have a direct effect on aquatic animals and indirect effects on human health. Therefore, this study evaluated the accumulation of heavy metals in water and Nile tilapia and conducted a health risk assessment from dermal exposure and consumption of the water and Nile tilapia in the Huai Luang River Basin, Thailand. The results found that trace amounts of zinc (Zn), chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) in the water samples had an average of 0.56 ± 0.34, 0.04 ± 0.03, 0.11 ± 0.05l, 0.08 ± 0.05 and 0.42 ± 0.66 mg/L, respectively. The average bioaccumulation of Zn, Cr, Cu, Cd and Pb in Nile tilapia were 26.81 ± 14.71, 0.88 ± 060, 4.38 ± 1.97, 1.29 ± 1.56 and 3.45 ± 3.45 mg/kg, respectively. The bioconcentration factors of the heavy metals in Nile tilapia, ordered from highest to lowest values, were Zn, Cu, Cr, Cd and Pb, respectively. However, the results of the human health risk assessment showed that the exposure to contaminated water with heavy metals would not be harmful. Nonetheless, the target hazard quotient for Cd and Pb and the hazard index from water and Nile tilapia consumption were higher than 1.0. These values indicated that consumption of water and Nile tilapia from Huai Luang River Basin could have risks to health effects from non-cancerous substances. These results are important information for the prevention and monitoring of water quality, including the safety of human health from water utilisation from this resource.

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.

Article Details

Section
Original Articles
Author Biographies

Atcharaporn Somparn , Office of General Education, Udon Thani Rajabhat University, Udon Thani, Thailand

Office of General Education, Udon Thani Rajabhat University, Udon Thani, Thailand

Kanittha Pamonpol , Faculty of Science and Technology, Valaya Alongkorn Rajabhat University under the Royal Patronage, Pathum Thani, Thailand

Faculty of Science and Technology, Valaya Alongkorn Rajabhat University under the Royal Patronage, Pathum Thani, Thailand

Natsima Tokhun, Faculty of Science and Technology, Valaya Alongkorn Rajabhat University under the Royal Patronage, Pathum Thani, Thailand

Faculty of Science and Technology, Valaya Alongkorn Rajabhat University under the Royal Patronage, Pathum Thani, Thailand

References

1. Zhang W, Zhang Y, Zhang L, Lin Q. Bioaccumulation of metals in tissues of seahorses collected from coastal China. Bulletin of Environmental Conta-mination and Toxicology. 2016, 96(3): 281–288.
2. Khalifa KM, Hamil AM, Al-Houni AQA, Ackacha MA. Determination of heavy metals in fish species of the Mediterranean Sea (Libyan coastline) using atomic absorption spectrometry. International Journal Pharm Tech Research. 2010;2: 1350–1354.
3. Vinodhini R, Naranan M. Bioaccu-mulation of heavy metals in organs of fresh water fish Cyprinus carpio (Common carp). International Journal of Environmental Science and Techno-logy. 2008;5(2): 179–182.
4. Koki1 IB, Bayero AS, Umar A, Yusuf S. Health risk assessment of heavy metals in water, air, soil and fish. African Journal of Pure and Applied Chemistry. 2015, 9(11): 204–210.
5. Hodgson E. A text nook of modern toxicology. 4th edition. British Toxi-cology Society. Wiley, North Carolina. 2011.
6. Vitek T, Spurny P, Mares J, Zikova A. Heavy metal contamination of the Loucka River water ecosystem. Acta Veterinaria Brno. 2007;76:149–154
7. Kori O, Ubogu OE. Sub-lethal hematological effects of zinc on the freshwater fish, Heteroclarias sp. (Osteichthyes : Clariidae). The African Journal of Biotechnology. 2008; 7(12):2068–2073.
8. Mansour SA and Sidky MM. Ecotoxicological studies 3. Heavy metals contaminating Water and Fish from Fayoum Governorate. Food Chemistry. 2016; 78(1):15–22.
9. Domingo JL, Bocio A, Flaco G, Llobet JM. Benefits and risks of fish consumption. Part 1. A quantitative analysis of the intake of omega-3 fatty acids and chemical contaminants. Toxicology. 2007; 230(2–3): 219–226.
10. Darwish AM, El-Mossalami MK, El-Bassuony RA. Quality assurance of some fatty fishes. Assuit Veterinary Medicine Journal 2003; 49(98):79–96.
11. Sow AY, Ismail A, Zulkifli SZ, Amal MN, Hambali KA. Survey on heavy metals contamination and health risk assessment in commercially valuable Asian swamp eel, Monopterus albus from Kelantan. Malaysia Scientific Reports. 2019; 9 (1): 6391, doi: 10.1038/s41598-019-42753-2.
12. Gabriel O, Rita O, Clifford A, Cynthia O, Harrison N, Kennedy K. Metal pollution of fish of Qua-Iboe River Estuary: Possible implications for neurotoxicity. International Journal of Toxicology. 2006; 3(1): 1–6.
13. Hasmi M, Anwar M. Health risk analysis of lead exposure from fish consumption among communities along Youtefa Gulf, Jayapura. Pakistan Journal of Nutrition. 2016;15(10): 929–935.
14. Regional environmental office 9. Full report water quality. 2015; The Mekong Basin (Udon Thani, Nong Khai, Sakon Nakhon, Nakhon Phanom Province). Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment. 2015.
15. Kim HJ, Koedrith P, Seo YR. Ecotoxicogenomic approaches for understanding molecular mechanisms of environmental chemical toxicity using aquatic invertebrate, Daphnia model organism. International Journal of Molecular Sciences. 2015; 29:16(6): 12261–87.
16. APHA. Standard methods for the examination of water and waste water. 20th Edition. New York: American Public Health Association (APHA), American Water Works Association (AWWA), and Water Pollution Control Federation (WPCF). 1996.
17. Campbell L, Dixon DG, Hecky RE. A review of mercury in Lake Victoria, East Africa: Implications for human and ecosystem health. Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health, Part B. 2003; 6(4): 325–356.
18. Chiou CT. Bioconcentration of organic contaminants: In partition and adsorption of organic contaminants in environmental systems. John Wiley and Sons, Inc., NJ. 2002.
19. US EPA. Supplementary guidance for conducting a health risk assessment of chemical mixtures. Washington DC, United States Environmental Protection Agency. 2000.
20. Omara T, Nteziyaremye P, Akaganyira S, et al. Physicochemical quality of water and health risks associated with the consumption of the Extant African Lung Fish (Protopterus annectens) from Nyabarongo and Nyabugogo Rivers, Rwanda. Preprints. 2019;1–16.
21. US EPA. Risk-based concentration table. Washington DC, United States Environmental Protection Agency. 2009.
22. US EPA. US EPA regional screening level (RSL) summary table. Washington DC, United States Environmental Protection Agency. 2011.
23. Emara MM, Farag RS, Dawah AA, Fathi M. Assessment of heavy metals concentration in water and edible tissues of Nile Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) from two Fish Farms irrigated with different water sources, Egypt. International Journal of Environment. 2015; 04 (1): 108–115.
24. AQUASTAT. Country fact sheet: Rwanda. FAO’s global information system on water and agriculture [internet]. 2008 [cited 2019 Dec 11]. Available from: http://www.fao.org/ aquastat/en/countries-and-basins/ countryprofiles/country/RWA
25. National Institute of Statistics of Rwanda. Life expectancy at birth [internet]. 2019 [cited 2019 Dec 26]. Available from: http://www.statistics. gov.rw/publication/life-expectancy-birth
26. Ordonez A, Alvarez R, Charlesworth S, De Miguel E, Loredo J. Risk assessment of soils contaminated by mercury mining, Northern Spain. Journal of Environmental Monitoring. 2011;13:128–136.
27. Omara T, Nteziyaremye P, Akaganyira S, et al. A Physicochemical quality of water and health risks associated with consumption of African Lung Fish (Protopterus annectens) from Nyabarongo and Nyabugogo rivers, Rwanda. MC Research Notes. 2020;10:13(1): 66.
28. Louvar JF, Louvar BD. Health and environmental risk analysis: Funda-mentals with Applications. New Jersey: Prentice Hall 1998.
29. Mohammadi AA, Zareib A, Majidi S, et al. Carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic health risk assessment of heavy metals in drinking water of Khorramabad, Iran Methods X. 2019;6: 1642–1651.
30. National Environmental Board. Surface water quality of Thailand standard. Bangkok: Office of Natural Resources and Environmental Policy and Planning. 1994.
31. Hamada MG, Elbayoumi ZH, Khader RA, Elbagory ARM. Assessment of heavy metal concentration in fish meat of wild and farmed Nile Tilapia (Oreochromis Niloticus), Egypt. Alexandria Journal of Veterinary Sciences. 2018; 57(1): 30–37.
32. Perera PACT, Kodithuwakku SP, Sundarabarathy TV, Edirisinghe U. Bioaccumulation of cadmium in freshwater fish: An environmental perspective. Insight Ecology. 2015; 4 (1): 1–12.
33. FAO/WHO. WHO technical report series No 505: Evaluation of certain food additives and the contaminants, mercury, lead and cadmium for environment monitory report No 52 center for environment. Aquaculture Science Lowest Tofit UK. 1989.
34. Chawpaknum C, Boon-ngam J, Palajaroen S. Heavy metal in the Bangpakong River.2012. Bangkok: Ministry of Agriculture and Cooperatives, Thailand. 2012.
35. Juwa S, Wongwat R, Manoton A. Health risk assessment and management from aquatic animal consumption in Kwan Phayao of people living around Kwan Phayao, Phayao Province. Udon Thani University Journal of Sciences and Technology. 2019; 7(1):1–16.
36. Tanee T, Thamsenanupap P, Sudmoon R, Chaveerach A. Bioconcentration of heavy metals in water, soil, sediment, and fish in Huay Geng Reservoir, Donjan District, Kalasin. Journal of Environmental Management. 2018; 3(1):1–19.
37. Tokhun N, Iwai CB. Assessment of water and sediment in cage aquaculture in Namphong River. Graduate Research Conference 2012, Khon Kaen University. 2012;SDP4-6.
38. Rajeshkumar S, Li X. Bioaccumulation of heavy metals in fish species from the Meiliang Bay, Taihu Lake, China. Toxicology Reports. 2018; 5:288–295.
39. Mohamed GH, Zakaria HE, Reda AK, et al. Assessment of heavy metal concentration in fish meat of wild and farmed Nile Tilapia (Oreochromis Niloticus), Egyp. Alexandria Journal of Veterinary Sciences. 2018,57(1): 30–37.
40. Sehar A, Shafaqat A, Uzma SA, et al. Effect of different heavy metal pollution on fish. Research Journal of Chemical and Environmental Sciences. 2014; 2 (1): 74–79.
41. Abdel-hakim NF, Helal AF, Salem M, et al. Effect of Some Heavy Metals on Physiological and Chemical Parameters in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus L.). Journal of Egyptian Academic Society for Environmental Development. 2016;17(1): 81–95.
42. Bowen HJM. Environment and chemistry of elements. London: Academic Press 1979.
43. Karlsson S, Meili M, Eco UBS, Safety AB. Bioaccumulation factors in aquatic ecosystems: A critical review. Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management. 2002.
44. Bury NR, Walker PA, Glover CN. Nutritive metal uptake in teleost fish. Journal of Experimental Biology. 2003; 206:11–23.
45. New York State Department of Health. Hopewell Precision area contamination, Appendix C-NYS DOH: Procedure for evaluating potential health risks for contaminants of concern [internet]. 2007. Available from https://www. health.ny.gov/environmental/investigations/hopewell/appendc.htm
46. USEPA (United States Environmental Protection Agency). EPA Region III Risk-Based Concentration (RBC) Table 2008 Region III, 1650 Arch Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19103. Washington DC: United States Environmental Protection Agency. 2012.