Gender Differences in Knowledge, Attitude, Food Choice and Body Image Perception among Children Aged 9-12 Years in Bangkok, Thailand

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Kallaya Kijboonchoo
Wiyada Thasanasuwan
Weerachart Srichan

Abstract

The objective of this study was to describe and compare the knowledge, attitude, food choice and bodyperception between gender, and nutritional status among Thai children. A cross sectional survey of 565children, aged 9-12 years in Bangkok was studied. Nutritional status of children was classified by usingBMI for aged based on WHO 2007 standard. A set of questionnaire was constructed, tested and used intarget group.The results demonstrated that the prevalence of over-nutrition was more pronounced in boys than in girls(29.2% in boys and 9.3% in girls, p < 0.001). Children’s knowledge about food and nutrition was foundto be satisfactory (≥ 69.2% for corrected answers) and was no different between gender. Having breakfastwas common for this group of children, 81.9% responded they always had breakfast, and less than 8% neverhad breakfast. The sources of food information were mainly family, television and teachers. The threemost important aspirations for girls are to be healthy, to grow big and strong, and to be happy; whereas forboys, these were to grow big and strong, to be healthy, and to be clever at school. Though, both boys andgirls agreed that food and exercise were important for health, there were some gender differences in theirperceptions. Girls and boys had different body image perceptions that might affect their food choice. Thisis an issue to be considered in health education for the policy makers to be aware of the different in bodyperception in Thai boys and girls.

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1.
Kijboonchoo K, Thasanasuwan W, Srichan W. Gender Differences in Knowledge, Attitude, Food Choice and Body Image Perception among Children Aged 9-12 Years in Bangkok, Thailand. J Public Hlth Dev [Internet]. 2014 Apr. 8 [cited 2024 Apr. 22];11(3):49-60. Available from: https://he01.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/AIHD-MU/article/view/15181
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Original Articles