Factors associated with the accident for residential construction workers in Udon Thani province, Thailand

Main Article Content

Piyabhorn Phawchamnan
Ganjana Nathapindhu

Abstract

Construction work is rather heavy and requires skilled labor and people who are trained to deal in possible dangerous environments calmly and safely. Without these measures in place the chances of health and safety in the workplace is more likely to cause accidents and injuries more than many other occupations. This research was aimed to study safety management in residential construction. Data was collected by in-depth interviews 10 construction projects with one project manager or construction supervisor or safety officer also 248 residential construction workers interviewed. Data was analyzed by descriptive statistics and inferential statistics for analyzing factors relating to accident and illness of residential construction workers. Analysis by Generalized Estimating Equation (GEE) was employed to develop the prediction models of accident, odd ratio and 95% CI as predictors in the process of modeling. Analysis of factors relating to accidents found that workers who did not work in primary jobs had 0.41 times the occupational accident rate. (Adj.OR = 0.41; 95% CI = 0.20 to 0.83; p-value = 0.014). Residential construction workers who had 11 to 15 years of work experience had 3.22 times higher occupational accident rate than those who have less than 5 years of work experience. (Adj.OR = 3.22; 95% CI = 2.93 to 3.55; p-value <0.001). Working with the same posture for more than one hour. The chances of work accidents were 2.88 times that of workers who work the same post repeatedly no more than one hour. (Adj.OR = 2.88; 95% CI = 1.16 to 7.18; p-value = 0.023). Construction workers who drank alcoholic beverages opportunity for work accidents were 2.50 times that of non-drinkers. (Adj.OR = 2.50; 95% CI = 1.12 to 5.56; p-value = 0.025). The risk of accidents during work with the pain include workers with shoulder pain have a 1.97 times higher risk than those without pain (Adj.OR = 1.97; 95% CI = 1.18 to 3.28; p-value = 0.009). Workers with lower back pain have a 1.27 times (Adj. OR = 1.27; 95% CI = 1.13 to 1.42; p-value <0.001). One worker suffering from hand and wrist pain had a 2.65 times (Adj.OR = 2.65; 95% CI = 1.84 to 3.79; p-value <0.001). Accident prevention in the construction sector is accomplished through feedback where established clear areas of risk along with danger labels, provide training on safety in work and use of personal protective equipment (PPE) for production planning, control and safety management are used.

Article Details

How to Cite
1.
Phawchamnan P, Nathapindhu G. Factors associated with the accident for residential construction workers in Udon Thani province, Thailand. J Public Hlth Dev [Internet]. 2019 Jun. 10 [cited 2024 Apr. 13];16(2):29-3. Available from: https://he01.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/AIHD-MU/article/view/119549
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Original Articles

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