Comparative ultrasonographic and computed tomographic images of the adrenal glands of healthy cats

Authors

  • Panrawee Phoomvuthisarn
  • Kiatpichet Komin
  • Nan Choisunirachon

Keywords:

Adrenal glands, Cats, Computed Tomography, Normal, Ultrasonography

Abstract

Feline adrenal disorders that affect the size of the adrenal glands can be detected by diagnostic imaging
including ultrasonography and Computed Tomography (CT). The objectives of this study were to compare the
appearance of the adrenal gland in healthy cats between these two techniques and establish the reference values of the
CT dimensions of the adrenal gland in cats. We found that there was no significant difference in the length of both
adrenal glands between the two techniques but the cranial and caudal heights of the left adrenal glands and cranial
height of the right adrenal gland obtained from the CT images in post-contrast enhanced-phase were significantly
thicker than those obtained from ultrasonography. Our results suggest the reference values (mean±SD) of the left
adrenal gland length, cranial, and caudal heights as 11.12 ± 2.65, 3.69 ± 0.72, and 3.70 ± 0.77 mm, respectively, and those
of the right adrenal gland as 11.00 ± 2.33, 3.80 ± 0.99, and 3.53 ± 0.73 mm, respectively. The dimensions of both adrenal
glands obtained from ultrasonography have more positive correlation with the age and body weight of the cats when
compared with those obtained from the CT. Different sensitivity between the two techniques might be the cause and
the images obtained from ultrasonography might be affected by the positioning and bodyweight of the patient.

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Published

2019-03-25

How to Cite

Phoomvuthisarn, P., Komin, K., & Choisunirachon, N. (2019). Comparative ultrasonographic and computed tomographic images of the adrenal glands of healthy cats. The Thai Journal of Veterinary Medicine, 48(4), 689–698. Retrieved from https://he01.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/tjvm/article/view/179874

Issue

Section

Short Communications