Factors Inducing Anxiety and Depression among Adult Myanmar Migrant Workers: A Case Study in Ratchaburi Province, Thailand

Authors

  • Aung Zaw Phyo College of Public Health Sciences, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand
  • Prathurng Hongsranagon College of Public Health Sciences, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand
  • Htoo Htoo Kyaw Soe College of Public Health Sciences, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand

Keywords:

Anxiety, Depression, Migrant workers, Myanmar, Ratchaburi province

Abstract

A cross-sectional study was carried out in Bann Leuk and Nongree sub-district, Ratchaburi province, Thailand in March, 2011. The main purposes of this study were to identify the prevalence distribution of anxiety and depression and to identify the association between socio-demographic and anxiety and depression among adult Myanmar migrant workers aged between 18 to 59 years who lived in Ratchaburi province, Thailand. This study was conducted with 300 samples by using a structured face-to-face interview questionnaire. The prevalence of anxiety in those migrants was 24.3 % moderate anxiety, 64.3% severe anxiety, 11.3% extreme anxiety and depression was 42.7% mild depression, 35.7% moderate depression, 16.7% severe depression. In bivariate analysis, living status and depression was also associated (p<0.05). A strategy for the mental health for these groups should be seen as a strategic investment which will create many long term benefits for individuals, societies and health systems. Professions in mental health such as psychologists, psychiatric nurses and social workers, should receive special training for appropriate knowledge and skills relating to mental health of migrants.

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How to Cite

Phyo, A. Z., Hongsranagon, P., & Soe, H. H. K. (2017). Factors Inducing Anxiety and Depression among Adult Myanmar Migrant Workers: A Case Study in Ratchaburi Province, Thailand. Journal of Health Research, 26(2), 101–103. Retrieved from https://he01.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/jhealthres/article/view/84676

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