The Significant Effect Influencing the Change of Mortality Rate Between 1997 and 2006

Authors

  • Kamolthip Vijitsoonthornkul Bureau of Non-communicable diseases, Department of Disease Control, Ministry of Public Health, Nongthaburi, Thailand
  • Yothin Sawangdee Institute for Population and Social Research, Mahidol University, Nakhon Prathom, Thailand
  • Aphichat Chamratrithrirong Institute for Population and Social Research, Mahidol University, Nakhon Prathom, Thailand
  • Wansa Paoin Faculty of Medicine, Thammasat University, Rangsit Campus, Khlong Luang, Patum-thani, Thailand

Keywords:

Kitagawa decomposition technique, changing of mortality rates

Abstract

After validating cause-of-death data following the modeled structure from verbal autopsy study, Katagawa decomposition technique was employed. The results provide evident that age effect and rate effect have affected population health. Age or demography effect consequently results in increasing of overall mortality, as well as three board causes of death, and some diseases which often relate to an increase with age and with accumulative risk over lifetime or degenerative disease. Whereas rate or epidemiologic effect has contributed to substantial changes either upward or downward mortality rate through complex nature of that disease and social context. Considering comparison of the percentage changes in age-adjusted mortality rates between age effect and rate effect influencing the increasing in specific-cause mortality rate, it seems ironic that rate effect was stronger than age effect. These findings indicated that enhancing comprehensively the relation of demography transition and epidemiologic transition is crucial for achieving public health policies of disease control and prevention.

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How to Cite

Vijitsoonthornkul, K., Sawangdee, Y., Chamratrithrirong, A., & Paoin, W. (2017). The Significant Effect Influencing the Change of Mortality Rate Between 1997 and 2006. Journal of Health Research, 26(2), 77–83. Retrieved from https://he01.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/jhealthres/article/view/84664

Issue

Section

ORIGINAL RESEARCH ARTICLE