Prevalence and Quality of Life (QOL) with Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS) among the Working Women in Reproductive Age Group in Bangkok, Thailand

Authors

  • Thipsiri Prungsin College of Public Health Sciences, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, 10330, Thailand
  • Surasak Taneepanichskul College of Public Health Sciences, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, 10330, Thailand

Keywords:

Premenstrual syndrome, Women with reproductive age group, Quality of life

Abstract

Background: Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) is the condition with one or more various symptoms to affect a daily life, work life, and social relationships. The symptom of PMS performs and disappears after the menstruation. The frequency of premenstrual related symptoms is approximately 80-90%. About 5% are severe symptoms which interfere with personal and social relationships. In many cases, it requires medication treatment. Many studies in Thailand were conducted among the working women in reproductive age group. Almost all data were collected from the adolescents, medical students or nurses. Therefore, this study was aimed to investigate the prevalence, factors association, and quality of life (QOL) with PMS in a different population.

Methods: A cross-sectional study carried out in Bangkok from July to August 2016. Sample population was recruited from a skincare company. Data were collected by self-reported questionnaires. The descriptive statistics were evaluated by mean ± SD, percentage (n = %), odd ratio (OR), and 95% confidential interval (CI). Continuous and categorical data were analyzed by Student’s t-test and chi-square (or Fisher’s exact test) respectively. The association between factors and PMS were identified by logistic regressions.

Results: One hundred and fourteen participants were recruited with mean age 34.5 ± 7.75 years. Prevalence of moderate to severe PMS was 11.4% and mild PMS/no PMS was 88.6%. Only 3 factors were associated with PMS (p<0.05): younger age (mean 30.0 ± 8.0 y) more than older age (OR = 0.61, 95%CI = 0.40 – 0.94), single marital status; more than married/divorce/widow/separated (OR = 11.31, 95%CI = 1.42 – 90.24), and bachelor and master degree more than lower education level (OR = 5.27, 95%CI = 1.08 – 25.78). Four domains classification of QOL in the PMS group were “Physical Health” 12.40±1.80, “Psychological” 13.23±2.27, “Social Relationship” 15.59±2.80, and “Environment” 13.35±2.40. The QOL was not different between PMS and non- PMS (p>0.05).

Conclusion: The prevalence of PMS among the working women in these study populations was not quite high. This study revealed the younger age had more suffer from PMS. Early screening and diagnosis might help to manage and relieve the suffering from PMS. Education, awareness, and appropriate guideline for PMS management are highly recommended to improve the QOL among the working women in reproductive age group.

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How to Cite

Prungsin, T., & Taneepanichskul, S. (2017). Prevalence and Quality of Life (QOL) with Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS) among the Working Women in Reproductive Age Group in Bangkok, Thailand. Journal of Health Research, 30(Suppl. 2), S139-S145. Retrieved from https://he01.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/jhealthres/article/view/80736

Issue

Section

ORIGINAL RESEARCH ARTICLE