Knowledge attitude and cultural factors toward utilization of insecticide treated nets (ITNS) among Rakhine ethnic group in Ann Township Rakhine State Myanmar: Cross sectional study

  • Aung Phyo Oo College of Public Health Sciences, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand
  • Sathirakorn Pongpanich College of Public Health Sciences, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand
Keywords: Malaria, Knowledge attitude cultural factors, Utilization of insecticide treated nets, Myanmar

Abstract

Purpose - Malaria is a life threatening disease; however, it can be prevented by the use of insecticide treated nets (ITNs). It is crucial to understand knowledge, attitudes, utilization of ITNs, and cultural factors in order to eliminate malaria among people. This study aimed to find associations between general characteristics, knowledge, attitudes and cultural factors toward utilization of ITNs among Rakhine ethnic groups, Rakhine State, Myanmar.

Design/methodology/approach - A cross-sectional study was conducted among 420 Rakhine ethnic groups, age from 18 years old and over. They were recruited from 10 villages in Ann Township, and were face to face interviewed in June, 2018. Chi-square test, Fisher’s exact test and logistic regression were employed to analyze association between dependent and independent variables.

Findings - Only 3.6% of respondents had good level of knowledge, 19.0% good level of attitude, and 38.8% good level of practice towards utilization of ITNs. Factors associated with good practice were female participants (p-value <0.001, AOR 8.015, 95% CI=3.395-18.923), high school level (p-value <0.001, AOR 14.518, 95% CI=4.642-45.408), married participants (p-value <0.001, AOR 13.753, 95% CI=4.371-43.267), widowed participants (p-value 0.039, AOR 5.403, 95% CI=1.085-26.909), knowledge level (p-value <0.001, AOR 5.125, 95% CI=1.062-6.429). For cultural factors, participants who always worked from dawn to night time (p-value 0.032, AOR 2.203, 95% CI =1.070-4.536).

Originality/value - Government and NGOs should integrate health education and encourage people to use ITNs rather than using a traditional approach.

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Published
2018-12-28
How to Cite
Oo, A. P., & Pongpanich, S. (2018). Knowledge attitude and cultural factors toward utilization of insecticide treated nets (ITNS) among Rakhine ethnic group in Ann Township Rakhine State Myanmar: Cross sectional study. Journal of Health Research, 32(Suppl.2), S193-S201. Retrieved from https://he01.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/jhealthres/article/view/168462
Section
ORIGINAL RESEARCH ARTICLE