Barriers to prompt and effective malaria treatment among malaria infected patients in Palaw township, Tanintharyi region, Myanmar

Authors

  • Zar Zar Naing College of Public Health Sciences, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand
  • Naowarat Kanchanakhan College of Public Health Sciences, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand

Keywords:

Malaria, Effective malaria treatment, Myanmar

Abstract

Purpose - The aim of this study was to assess barriers (socio-demographic characteristics, knowledge of malaria, behaviors related to malaria treatment and health system factors) regarding prompt and effective malaria treatment among malaria infected patients in Palaw Township, Tanintharyi Region, Myanmar.

Design/methodology/approach - A cross-sectional study was conducted from January 2018 – March 2018 in 17 high risk malaria villages of Palaw Township. The study populations were 18 to 65 years old malaria infected patients. The total sample size of 204 malaria infected patients were selected randomly from each village proportionately. Face-to-face interview method was employed by using structured questionnaires.

Findings - Majority of respondents (85.8%) did not get prompt and effective malaria treatment within 24 hours due to barriers. There were statistically significant with socio-demographic characteristics (p-value <0.05), good knowledge of malaria (p-value < 0.001, AOR= 65.3, 95% CI), good behaviors related to treatment seeking (p-value = 0.021, AOR = 3.889, 95% CI), health system factors (p-value<0.05) and prompt and effective malaria treatment at 95% confidence interval.

Originality/value - The prompt and effective malaria treatment was influenced by socio-demographic characteristics, knowledge of malaria, behaviors related to treatment seeking and health system factors. Enhancing the knowledge and promoting good behaviors about malaria should be implemented through health education sessions. Health system factors regarding health providers should be managed by the Local Health Authority.

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Published

2018-12-21

How to Cite

Naing, Z. Z., & Kanchanakhan, N. (2018). Barriers to prompt and effective malaria treatment among malaria infected patients in Palaw township, Tanintharyi region, Myanmar. Journal of Health Research, 32(Suppl.1), S104-S111. Retrieved from https://he01.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/jhealthres/article/view/164680

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Section

ORIGINAL RESEARCH ARTICLE