Prevalence of Salmonella spp. contamination in hen egg and relationship among sociodemographic knowledge and behavior of the egg consumer in Bangkok, Thailand

Authors

  • Pollawat Sriruengsuk College of Public Health Sciences, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand
  • Wattasit Siriwong College of Public Health Sciences, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand

Keywords:

Salmonella, Egg, Consumption behavior, Consumption hygiene, Thailand

Abstract

Purpose - Salmonella spp. is the one of most common foodborne pathogen. Hen eggs play a crucial role as a main source of Salmonellosis. The aim of this study was to investigate the contamination rate of Salmonella spp. in eggs and determine the knowledge and behavior level of egg consumption in egg consumers of Sukhumvit area Bangkok, Thailand.

Design/methodology/approach - A cross-sectional survey was performed by randomly selected 196 eggs pooled samples from Salmonella free, chemical free and ordinary group. The ISO 6579:2002 method and Kauffman and White classification scheme were used to detect the Salmonella spp. and identify their serovars. Cochran Q test was used to compare the contamination rate among each egg group. The parallel cross-sectional survey of 404 egg consumers was conducted by using questionnaire, to determine the level of egg consumption hygiene knowledge and behavior. The scores were described by using descriptive statistic and Fisher’s exact test. Spearman’s correlation was performed to find significant associations between knowledge and behavior score. 

Findings - The 5.05% of all egg samples were found Salmonella spp. The contamination rate was not significantly different among each egg groups (p=0.082). The 72.7% of respondents were indicated as poor knowledge egg consumption. The 48.0% of respondents were indicated as poor egg consumption behavior. The knowledge score was associated with age, education, income, egg buying place and consumption rate (p<0.05) while behavior was not, and this study showed no correlation between knowledge and behavior score (p=0.443).

Originality/value - The contamination rates of Salmonella among each egg group were not different. Age, education level and income were the socio-demographic factors associated with level of egg consumption hygiene knowledge and consumption behavior. However, it could not guarantee the high knowledge, could cause the better behavior of egg consumption.

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Published

2018-12-21

How to Cite

Sriruengsuk, P., & Siriwong, W. (2018). Prevalence of Salmonella spp. contamination in hen egg and relationship among sociodemographic knowledge and behavior of the egg consumer in Bangkok, Thailand. Journal of Health Research, 32(Suppl.1), S1-S8. Retrieved from https://he01.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/jhealthres/article/view/164549

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Section

ORIGINAL RESEARCH ARTICLE