Complementary Practices of Herbalists in the Kingdom of Bahrain

  • Tariq A. Alalwan Department of Biology, College of Science, University of Bahrain, Sakhir Campus, P.O. Box 32038, Bahrain
  • Qaher A. Mandeel Department of Biology, College of Science, University of Bahrain, Sakhir Campus, P.O. Box 32038, Bahrain
  • Abdul Ameer A. Al-Laith Department of Biology, College of Science, University of Bahrain, Sakhir Campus, P.O. Box 32038, Bahrain
  • Jameel A. Alkhuzai Department of Biology, College of Science, University of Bahrain, Sakhir Campus, P.O. Box 32038, Bahrain
Keywords: Bahrain herbalists, Folk medicine, Medicinal plants

Abstract

Background: The aim of the present study was to assess the general knowledge and practice of local herbalists regarding the use of medicinal plants for the treatment of various ailments.

Methods: The study utilized a pre-structured questionnaire to collect data. The sample consisted of 41 well-known, established and active herbalists in Bahrain.

Results: The majority of herbalists were male (95.1%) with a high school education. Almost half the respondents obtained their knowledge and training from parents and grandparents. The herbalists combine heritage, religious and cultural values in their profession. The majority (95.1%) of herbalists deal with manageable diseases despite the high confidence of patients in herbal medicine. The main ailments treated are diabetes, gastrointestinal problems, and hypertension.

Conclusions: Study findings indicate that most herbalists (95.1%) perceive their role to be one of providing complementary health care. The herbal profession in Bahrain needs to be preserved and developed based on a scientific methodology among the younger generations.

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Published
2017-11-28
How to Cite
Alalwan, T. A., Mandeel, Q. A., Al-Laith, A. A. A., & Alkhuzai, J. A. (2017). Complementary Practices of Herbalists in the Kingdom of Bahrain. Journal of Health Research, 31(6), 487-499. Retrieved from https://he01.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/jhealthres/article/view/104270