Symptom management of persons with end-stage renal disease receiving continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis

Authors

  • Dekyong E Faculty of Nursing, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai
  • Srirat C Faculty of Nursing, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai
  • Tachaudomdach C Faculty of Nursing, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai

Keywords:

symptom management, persons with end - stage renal disease, continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis

Abstract

Objectives The objective of this study was to categorize the symptoms and methods of symptom management of people with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) receiving continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD).

Methods This descriptive research study purposively sampled 293 ESRD patients receiving CAPD in four hospitals. Research instruments included 1) a general data record form, 2) an interview form for assessment of the CKD Symptom Burden Index (CKD-SBI), and 3) a symptoms management
interview form for ESRD patients receiving CAPD. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics.

Results Itching was the most frequently reported symptom (67.23%), with mean frequency, severity, and distress scores of “X” x ± SD of 4.51 ± 1.62, 4.59 ± 1.34, and 5.53 ± 1.70, respectively. The participants used a variety of methods to manage each of the five main symptoms including: 1) applying cream or lotion for itching (84.80%), 2) general touching/squeezing for bone or joint pain (86.70%), 3) relaxing in a sitting position or lying down for muscle soreness (90.30%), 4) foot stretching and contraction plus ankle flexing for muscle cramps (77.10%), and 5) relaxing or resting in a sitting position or lying down for headaches (94.50%).

Conclusions The results of this research provide basic information for nurses and health care personnel to use in assessing patients’ symptom experience and can help guide for the planning of care as well as recommending or promoting symptom management for people with end-stage renal disease who are receiving continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis. Development of a symptom management model for people with end-stage renal diseases receiving continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis is recommended.

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Published

2021-10-01

How to Cite

1.
E D, C S, C T. Symptom management of persons with end-stage renal disease receiving continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis. Chiang Mai Med J. [Internet]. 2021 Oct. 1 [cited 2022 May 25];60(4):655-73. Available from: https://he01.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/CMMJ-MedCMJ/article/view/253953

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Original Article