Prevalence and related factors of musculoskeletal discomfort among workers in a frozen seafood factory in Samut Songkhram Province

Authors

  • Wuttayakorn T Department of Preventive and Social Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok
  • Supapong S Department of Preventive and Social Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok

Keywords:

prevalence, musculoskeletal discomfort, production workers in a frozen seafood factory

Abstract

Objectives This study aimed to investigate the prevalence and related factors of musculoskeletal discomfort (MSD) among workers in a frozen seafood factory in Samut Songkhram Province.

Methods The study design was a cross-sectional descriptive study in all 524 recruited seafood production workers, without randomization. Data were collected using general questionnaires and Standardised Nordic Questionnaires in Thai version, which the researcher and the language interpreter conducted interviews with all the samples by themselves. Data were analyzed by descriptive statistics and multiple logistic regression analysis.

Results The prevalence of overall musculoskeletal discomfort (discomfort in at least one part of the body) in seafood production workers within the last 7 days, the last 12 months and the last 12 months that affected works were 36.83%, 55.34% and 26.90%, respectively. The lower back was the area with the highest prevalence of MSD, followed by shoulder. Factors related to musculo-skeletal discomfort were having a high level of education, increasing income, having underlying disease, drinking alcohol and repetitive work pattern (Slicing, Trimming and Packing).

Conclusion The musculoskeletal discomfort was rather highly prevalent in all body parts of seafood production workers. Health promotion, education and correct ergonomic posture should be provided to reduce the prevalence of MSD and work risks.

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Published

2021-10-01

How to Cite

1.
T W, S S. Prevalence and related factors of musculoskeletal discomfort among workers in a frozen seafood factory in Samut Songkhram Province. Chiang Mai Med J. [Internet]. 2021 Oct. 1 [cited 2022 May 25];60(4):615-28. Available from: https://he01.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/CMMJ-MedCMJ/article/view/253944

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Original Article