Self-management activities and diabetes control of diabetic patients in Muang district, Nan province

Authors

  • Sritharathikun W Department of Family Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University
  • Pinyopornpanish K Department of Family Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University
  • Aramrat C Department of Family Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University
  • Buawangpong N Department of Family Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University
  • Khrueapaeng P Department of Family Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University
  • Angkurawaranon C Department of Family Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University

Keywords:

diabetes, self-efficacy, self-management

Abstract

Objectives  To evaluate the prevalence of uncontrolled diabetes and diabetic self-care activities in type 2 diabetic patients in Muang District, Nan Province and to explore the association between self-care activities and glycemic control.

Methods  Participants were interviewed for general information, self-care activities and self-efficacy. Self-care activities in diabetic patients were assessed using the Summary Diabetes Self-Care Activities (SDSCA) questionnaire. Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) was collected to evaluate glycemic control. The data was analyzed using logistic regression analysis.

Results Of 222 patients, more than half (56.76%) had poor glycemic control. Using multivariate regression analysis, lower SDSCA scores in diet and foot care activities were found to be associated with poor glycemic control (adjusted odds ratio = 2.29, p < 0.001 and adjusted odds ratio = 1.52, respectively; p-value 0.022).

Conclusion  The majority of the diabetic patients had poor glycemic control. Healthy diet is an important factor in good glycemic control.  The association between foot care activity and glycemic control may not be straight forward; however, good foot care may represent adherence to prescribed diabetes treatment and appropriate life-style modification.

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Published

2021-04-01

How to Cite

1.
W S, K P, C A, N B, P K, C A. Self-management activities and diabetes control of diabetic patients in Muang district, Nan province. Chiang Mai Med J. [Internet]. 2021 Apr. 1 [cited 2022 Jan. 25];60(2):187-96. Available from: https://he01.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/CMMJ-MedCMJ/article/view/249784

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Original Article