Effects of different forms of communication on knowledge, attitudes and practices related to antibiotics smart use by undergraduate students in different faculties

Authors

  • Ucharattana T Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University
  • Naktang N Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University
  • Chanaveroj S Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University
  • Wanwattanakul P Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University
  • Hittrawat S Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University
  • Sastraruji T Dentistry Research Center, Faculty of Dentistry, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai
  • Sookkhee S Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University

Keywords:

antibiotics smart use, knowledge, attitudes, practices, communication

Abstract

Objectives  To investigate correlations among different forms of communications and the knowledge, attitudes and practices of undergraduate students related to antibiotics smart use.

Methods Correlations of knowledges, attitudes, and practices regarding antibiotics and different forms of communications among third year students of three faculties, Associated Medical Sciences (AMS), Engineering (ENG) and Economics (ECON), were computed using a questionnaire and Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient analysis.

Results  The highest correct knowledge and practices scores were exhibited by AMS students:  3.17 ± 1.12 (p < 0.001) and 4.08 ± 0.67 (p = 0.001), respectively. Gender, the only personal factor, was significantly correlated with negative attitudes and practices among Engineering and Economics students. Correct knowledge scores were significantly correlated with the method of communication. Only weak relationships were found with communication from medical practitioners among AMS and Engineering students, r = 0.278 (p = 0.004); and r = 0.295 (p < 0.001). Correlations were also weak for radio, television, and print media among the Engineering students, r = 0.287, (p = 0.003). A moderate relationship was found with communication from the internet in Engineering students, r=0.311 (p < 0.001), health posters or brochures, and family or close friends of the AMS students, r =0.329, (p = 0.001), and r = 0.305, (p = 0.001), respectively. Other correlations were not statistically significant.

Conclusion  Antibiotics Smart Use (ASU) is an innovative model to promote the rational use of medicines, fight against the irrational use of antibiotics, and counteract antimicrobial resistance. The present study revealed that the information regarding antibiotics smart use provided via various forms of communications should be provided to improve the knowledge, attitude, and practice regarding antibiotics smart use among undergraduate students.

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Published

2021-04-01

How to Cite

1.
T U, N N, S C, P W, S H, T S, S S. Effects of different forms of communication on knowledge, attitudes and practices related to antibiotics smart use by undergraduate students in different faculties. Chiang Mai Med J. [Internet]. 2021 Apr. 1 [cited 2022 Jan. 26];60(2):135-48. Available from: https://he01.tci-thaijo.org/index.php/CMMJ-MedCMJ/article/view/249780

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